motel-of-the-mysteries-by-david-macaulay

 

This piece is the last in a week-long series about the end of America in fiction. For the full archives of the series, check back here throughout the week. 

Considering how America might meet its demise is usually an exercise that leads us to take ourselves extremely seriously. We’re the world’s greatest superpower, so what will happen in the vacuum we leave behind? What will it be that causes our demise? Our financial hubris? The power we’ve granted the police? Our mesmerization by tech gurus? The return of Jesus Christ himself? The clack of my laptop keys sounds a lot like the inevitable gnashing of teeth that accompanies this subject.

And this agita is one of the reasons I wanted to end Act Four’s week devoted to the end of America by talking about David Macaulay’s children’s book “Motel of the Mysteries.” Macaulay is probably best known for his beautifully illustrated explanatory books, including “The Way Things Work,” “Castle” and “Pyramid.” Those books often had their funny side notes, but in “Motel of the Mysteries” Macaulay turns positively wicked, bringing his British-born sensibility to bear as he skewers the idea that America’s greatest accomplishments will be recognized for what they were long after they’re gone.

WE’VE HAD A GOOD SUCCESS RATE ON THIS ASSIGNMENT. PLACE THIS ORDER OR A SIMILAR ORDER WITH HOMEWORK AIDER AND GET AN AMAZING DISCOUNT”

Post your order to get it done from scratch by our writers today

ORDER NOW